Turning Your Dark, Damp and Cold Basement into a Spacious Basement Home Office

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The basement is often seen as the least desirable place to work because it’s dark, damp and cold. If you’re thinking about turning your basement into basement home office, read on. You’ll learn how to make a home office in your basement so you can take advantage of this underutilized space without having to deal with the downsides. There are some simple steps you can follow that will help ensure success even if your basement is below grade or doesn’t have windows for natural light.

With just a few hours of work, you could be enjoying all the benefits of working from home in a comfortable environment that’s perfect for getting things done!

Contents

Make sure the basement has good drainage

If you have a basement that is below grade or doesn’t have windows, it will likely be dark and damp. If the room floods during heavy rains, there’s no guarantee your home office will remain dry until the problem can be fixed. You’ll want to make sure any wet areas are dried up before turning them into an office space for this reason. You’ll also want to install a sump pump or other drainage system so any excess water doesn’t build up.

Make sure the basement is well ventilated

Even if your basement is dry and you have a drain, it’s important to make sure the air is well ventilated. It gets stuffy down there quickly so installing an exhaust fan with either windows or vents will help keep things from getting too stagnant. Many people install whole house fans in their basements which can pull cool fresh air through the basement and expel hot, stale air.

Make sure the basement has enough space to work in comfortably

One of the biggest problems with basements is that they tend to be long and narrow which forces you to sit at your desk sideways or contort yourself into an uncomfortable position just so you can face your computer screen. If possible, try to find a room where there’s some natural light coming through the windows as well as ample head clearance if it’s low ceilinged like many basements are.

You’ll want at least 40 inches of overhead clearance for most home office furniture but this may not always be possible depending on how far below grade your basement flooring sits (more than 18″ below ground level). It might also help if there were no obstructions in the room such as a pillar or furnace.

Clean up – remove all debris and junk

Start by removing all debris, junk and furniture from the basement. Clean the floors thoroughly to remove any dust, dirt or grime. A clean and organized basement will be easier to work in and more welcoming, especially for visitors.

Provide at least 2 feet of space between walls

Figure out how much space you have available. The minimum is 4 square feet without any obstructions from support posts or columns. Make sure there’s a least 3 feet of open floor space if the office has to fit around any existing pillars or columns.

Allow for adequate headroom

The room should have a minimum clearance of 6-feet high so you can stand up straight inside the room with your arms extended straight down your body. You’ll also want to make sure the ceiling height is high enough to accommodate electrical wiring and low-hanging light fixtures.

Adjust the basement windows if needed

If your basement doesn’t have windows, you’ll need to install one before turning it into an office. You’ll need to find other ways to bring in natural light. One option is to install a light tube, which brings sunlight down into the basement through a small hole in the ceiling. This adds both natural light and fresh air circulation that will help keep you productive.

Use the right flooring material

You’ll want to avoid using any materials on the floor that may absorb moisture like concrete, wood or tile. Instead use a water resistant material like vinyl or resilient floors so liquids can be easily wiped up without leaving behind stains or odors. Use matting under rolling chairs to further reduce moisture absorption from people walking in and out of the office.

basement home office ideas

Use fluorescent lighting for adequate light

The basement is often seen as the least desirable place to work because it’s dark, damp and cold. If you’re thinking about turning your basement into an office, read on. You’ll learn how to make a home office in your basement so you can take advantage of this underutilized space without having to deal with the downsides. There are some simple steps you can follow that will help ensure success even if your basement is below grade or doesn’t have windows for natural light.

Add a desk, chair and shelves to the basement office

The first step is to add some furniture to make the space feel more like an office. A desk and chair are a must, and shelves can be helpful for storage. If your basement is particularly dark or dreary, consider adding a light fixture or some colorful artwork to brighten things up.

Create a comfortable work environment

The last thing you want is for your basement office to feel like a dungeon, so make sure you create a comfortable work environment. Add some rugs or throw pillows to make the space more cozy, and try to keep the temperature comfortable by using a space heater if necessary.

Basement with enough space to work in comfortably

One of the biggest problems with basements is that they tend to be long and narrow which forces you to sit at your desk sideways or contort yourself into an uncomfortable position just so you can face your computer screen. If possible, try to find a room where there’s some natural light coming through the windows as well as ample head clearance if it’s low ceilinged like many basements are. You’ll want at least 40 inches of overhead clearance for most home office furniture but this may not always be possible depending on how far below grade your basement flooring sits (more than 18″ below ground level).

It might also help if there were no obstructions in the room such as a pillar or furnace.

Add comfortable lighting to make your office space feel inviting

It’s important to have good quality task lighting if you’re going to be spending long hours working from home. The best way is by adding recessed lights that can either point directly at your work area, bounce light off of one wall and shine upwards towards the ceiling (called indirect lighting) or use both methods together for maximum illumination.

If none of these options are available due to head clearance restrictions, then go with individual lamps that can direct their own beams wherever they need them most instead of relying on overhead fixtures which will leave shadowy areas around the rest of the room. Add lots of electrical so you don’t trip over cords

Having a few outlets strategically placed around the room will make it much easier to plug in your computer and any other electrical devices you may use while working. You’ll also want to add some if there aren’t enough for everything that needs power, especially overhead lights and fans which eat up multiple plugs at once!

Make sure the basement has easy access to all of your home’s main amenities

If you’re going to be spending so much time down there every day then it should definitely have its own bathroom or even full kitchen with appliances like a fridge, stovetop and sink (although this is often not possible due to space restrictions). The lack of running water can become an issue after long hours spent working without having something nearby where you can go when nature calls.

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Improve the appearance of your basement home office with paint and some DIY decorating touches

Having a home office is great for productivity but it can feel uninviting if you don’t apply any style elements to make things look more appealing. Fresh coats of paint on all four walls, new carpeting or floor tiles, some plants in corners near windows (to help add natural light) and even lighting fixtures that match other rooms in your house are simple changes you can do yourself without spending too much money!

As long as there’s good ventilation then painting should not be an issue down here either since fumes won’t get trapped by lack of air circulation like they would upstairs or outside where fresh breeze sate them quickly. No one wants to spend hours working in an environment that feels like a basement!

Conclusion

Turning your dark, damp and cold basement into a spacious basement home office is not as hard as it sounds. There are a few key steps to take to ensure that you’re setting up the best possible space for yourself or other family members who may want their own area of the house. The first thing you’ll need to do is make sure there’s good drainage in case water ever spills out from upstairs bathrooms or kitchens onto your flooring downstairs. Secondly, ventilation will be important so air can flow through the room easily – this means opening windows during warm months and running an exhaust fan at night when heating isn’t needed.

Be sure to have enough space on which to work comfortably by clearing off any unnecessary furniture. We’ve outlined above what steps are necessary before turning your basement into a spacious home office where you can get more done without ever having to leave the house. Have any of these tips helped transform your own work area? Hopefully so! Let us know how we’ve been able to help out by leaving a comment down below. Check out below furniture and equipment from amazon for basement home office

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